Frequently asked questions

DOES IT BOTHER YOU WHEN PEOPLE WATCH YOU PAINT?


No, I love sharing my creative process. People enjoy watching me paint. It is part of the guests experience, entertainment, and the show. I’m comfortable painting in public and, as an Art Teacher, I’m happy to answer some questions your guests might have about painting, art history, and the techniques I use. I started studying Art since 1996 and I have professionally painted in public since 2003.




CAN WE CHOOSE WHO OR WHAT GOES IN THE PAINTING?


Yes, I always recommend the focus stays on the bride and groom, parents of both sides, siblings, best man and maid of honor. Depending on the composition you’re looking for, some elements and people may be out of focus, more abstract or totally out of the composition. It is important to me that you are happy with your art. We do a 30-minute phone consultation to help you make decisions on who to incorporate, how much of the background is important. The details of the creative process is in your hands. You can add someone who couldn’t make the event, symbols that are important to you, fur babies so you obtain the most personalized painting.




HOW MUCH SPACE DO YOU NEED FOR YOUR SETUP?


I need about 4’ x 4’. I bring my own equipment. I don’t need extra tables, chairs or lighting. For evening and interior weddings I do need access to an electrical outlet for my light.




HOW FAR IN ADVANCE DO YOU ARRIVE TO MY EVENT?


2-4 hours. So I can take photos of the ceremony and paint at the reception or to setup my equipment if the focus is the reception. I begin your composition by capturing your lovescape that we discussed in your 30-minute consultation. I’ll start layering landscape, architecture, florals, and decorations before the guests arrive, that way I have a background and I can pay attention to the people.




HOW LONG WILL YOU BE PAINTING AT MY WEDDING?


There will be 4-hours of painting at the event venue, be it the wedding ceremony or the reception. I get there a few hours before to assemble my materials and assess the details of the place, so I have more time to add the guests and of course highlight the bride and groom. I offer additional time for editing and improvements in the painting after the event, in my studio. Live Ceremony or Reception Painting. 4 hours on-sight plus 2 hours in my studio Large Live Painting 4-hours on-sight plus 10 hours in the studio for more detail. Extra Large Live Painting 4-hours on-sight plus an additional 36hours in the studio for the finest detail.




CAN I GET PRINTS OF MY PAINTING?


Yes! You will receive a digital file that can be printed any size, from tiny greeting cards to big giclée canvases for you or your loved ones.




HOW SOON SHOULD I BOOK MY LIVE EVENT PAINTING?


I recommend you book as soon as possible. Some couples book up to 18-months in advance. We are blessed with gorgeous weather year round. Yet, summer and whale season are the most popular times in Maui. It is important to make a prior consultation to plan and help you make creative decisions to incorporate those people who matter most to you, and also obtain the best possible painting. The more time I have getting familiar with the love story, the better and easier the result.




WHAT IF MY WEDDING IS OUTSIDE OF MAUI?


Pricing varies based on the location of the wedding, airfare, accommodation, and if there are multiple dates required. Email me your request, and I’d be happy to help with a quote.




WHAT IS AN IMPRESSIONISTIC PAINTING?


Impressionist painting seeks to re-create the artist's or viewer's general impression of a scene. Impressionism is a movement of art that emerged in 1870s France. Rejecting the rigid rules of the beaux-arts (“fine arts”), Impressionist artists showcased a new way to observe and depict the world in their work, foregoing realistic portrayals for fleeting impressions of their surroundings—which, often, were found outside. “Instead of painting in a studio, the impressionists found that they could capture the momentary and transient effects of sunlight by working quickly, in front of their subjects, in the open air (en plein air) rather than in a studio,” the Tate explains. “This resulted in a greater awareness of light and color and the shifting pattern of the natural scene. Brushwork became rapid and broken into separate dabs in order to render the fleeting quality of light.” This new approach to painting diverged from traditional techniques, culminating in a movement that changed the course of art history.